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Roosevelt and the Holocaust. A Rooseveltian Examines the Policies and Remembers the Times

Beir, Robert L., and Brian Josepher.

Fort Lee, New Jersey : Barricade Books Inc, 2006.

324 pages.

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The year was 1932. At age fourteen Robert Beir's journey through life changed irrevocably when a classmate called him a "dirty Jew." The classmate put up his fists. Suddenly Beir encountered the belligerent poison of anti-Semitism. The safe confines of his upbringing had been violated. The pain that he felt at that moment was far more hurtful than any blow. Its memory would last a lifetime. Beir's experience with anti-Semitism served as a microcosm for the anti-Semitism in the country at large. Opinion polls showed that 15 percent of the population thirsted for a large-scale anti-Jewish campaign and 35 to 40 percent of all Americans would have gone along with one. That year, a politician named Franklin Delano Roosevelt moved into the White House. Over the next twelve years, he instilled optimism and new confidence in a nation that had been mired in fear and deeply depressed. His presidency saved the capitalist system. His strong leadership helped to defeat Hitler. The Jews of America revered President Roosevelt. In the election of 1940, 90 percent of all Jewish Americans who voted, voted for Roosevelt. To Robert Beir, Roosevelt was a hero.

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ISBN:

978-1-56980-311-0

Author:

Beir, Robert L., and Brian Josepher.

Title:

A Rooseveltian Examines the Policies and Remembers the Times Roosevelt and the Holocaust.

Publisher:

Fort Lee, New Jersey : Barricade Books Inc, 2006.

Physical:

324 pages.

Summary:

The year was 1932. At age fourteen Robert Beir's journey through life changed irrevocably when a classmate called him a "dirty Jew." The classmate put up his fists. Suddenly Beir encountered the belligerent poison of anti-Semitism. The safe confines of his upbringing had been violated. The pain that he felt at that moment was far more hurtful than any blow. Its memory would last a lifetime. Beir's experience with anti-Semitism served as a microcosm for the anti-Semitism in the country at large. Opinion polls showed that 15 percent of the population thirsted for a large-scale anti-Jewish campaign and 35 to 40 percent of all Americans would have gone along with one. That year, a politician named Franklin Delano Roosevelt moved into the White House. Over the next twelve years, he instilled optimism and new confidence in a nation that had been mired in fear and deeply depressed. His presidency saved the capitalist system. His strong leadership helped to defeat Hitler. The Jews of America revered President Roosevelt. In the election of 1940, 90 percent of all Jewish Americans who voted, voted for Roosevelt. To Robert Beir, Roosevelt was a hero.

Subject:

Roosevelt--Holocaust--Great Depression

Subject:

Jews--Antisemitism--Hitler

Subject:

Franklin Delano Roosvelt--Capitalism--Hero.

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020 ISBN   $a ISBN  978-1-56980-311-0
100 ME:PersonalName   $a Personal name  Beir, Robert L., and Brian Josepher.
245 Title $b Remainder of title  A Rooseveltian Examines the Policies and Remembers the Times
    $a Title  Roosevelt and the Holocaust.
260 PublicationInfo   $a Place of publication, dist.  Fort Lee, New Jersey :
    $b Name of publisher, dist, etc  Barricade Books Inc,
    $c Date of publication, dist, etc  2006.
300 Physical Desc   $a Extent  324 pages.
520 Summary   $a Summary, etc. note  The year was 1932. At age fourteen Robert Beir's journey through life changed irrevocably when a classmate called him a "dirty Jew." The classmate put up his fists. Suddenly Beir encountered the belligerent poison of anti-Semitism. The safe confines of his upbringing had been violated. The pain that he felt at that moment was far more hurtful than any blow. Its memory would last a lifetime. Beir's experience with anti-Semitism served as a microcosm for the anti-Semitism in the country at large. Opinion polls showed that 15 percent of the population thirsted for a large-scale anti-Jewish campaign and 35 to 40 percent of all Americans would have gone along with one. That year, a politician named Franklin Delano Roosevelt moved into the White House. Over the next twelve years, he instilled optimism and new confidence in a nation that had been mired in fear and deeply depressed. His presidency saved the capitalist system. His strong leadership helped to defeat Hitler. The Jews of America revered President Roosevelt. In the election of 1940, 90 percent of all Jewish Americans who voted, voted for Roosevelt. To Robert Beir, Roosevelt was a hero.
650 Subj:Topic   $a Topical term  Roosevelt
    $x General subdivision  Holocaust
    $x General subdivision  Great Depression
650 Subj:Topic   $a Topical term  Jews
    $x General subdivision  Antisemitism
    $x General subdivision  Hitler
650 Subj:Topic   $a Topical term  Franklin Delano Roosvelt
    $x General subdivision  Capitalism
    $x General subdivision  Hero.
852 Holdings   $a Location  DOJE
    $h Classification part  NF Be
    $p Barcode  32424612513203
    $9 Cost  $0.00

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